Articles:Past participle

Level A1

The past participle (lýsingarháttur þátíðar) is a verb form where the verb has been formed as if it were an adjective (a describing word).

If we take the word að fara (to go), we can create the past participle like so:

  • Það er farið. (It is gone)

The word form farið functions exactly like an adjective and it inflects just like an adjective:

  • Hann er farinn. (He is gone)
  • Hún er farin. (She is gone)

Click here to see all the inflectional forms of the verb að fara. Then scroll down to "Past participle" to see the full table for how farinn changes.

“Hafa” and “geta” cause the past participle

The past participle also appears in another very important and common context: When a word appears with hafa (to have) and geta (to be able to).

For the word hafa, this is exactly the same thing as happens in English:

  • Ég hef farið þangað. (I have gone there)

The word form "gone" is a past participle, and the word "farið" is a past participle just like we saw in the above section.

Unlike in English however, the same happens with the word að geta:

  • Ég get farið (I can go)

The form used in this context is always the neuter form in the first case.[1] It does not change depending on the subject.

How to form the past participle

The formation of the past participle does not follow any rules that you can easily memorize and there are many irregular ones. What you're usually trying to do is to make the word end in -að, -ið, or -t.

Regular -að words include:

  • að baka → ég hef bakað
  • að borga → ég hef borgað
  • að borða → ég hef borðað
  • að elska → ég hef elskað
  • að geta → ég hef getað
  • að muna → ég hef munað
  • að nota → ég hef notað
  • að svara → ég hef svarað
  • að tala → ég hef talað
  • að vanta → mig hefur vantað
  • að vita → ég hef vitað

Regular -ið words include:

  • að búa → ég hef búið
  • að fara → ég hef farið
  • að fyrirgefa → ég hef fyrirgefið
  • að gefa → ég hef gefið
  • að halda → ég hef haldið
  • að sofa → ég hef sofið
  • að vera → ég hef verið

Regular -t words include:

  • að breyta → ég hef breytt
  • að færa → ég hef fært
  • að gera → ég hef gert
  • að gleyma → ég hef gleymt
  • að heyra → ég hef heyrt
  • að hitta → ég hef hitt
  • að kenna → ég hef kennt
  • að læra → ég hef lært
  • að reyna → ég hef reynt
  • að selja → ég hef selt
  • að sýna → ég hef sýnt
  • að þekkja → ég hef þekkt
  • að þurfa → ég hef þurft
  • að þýða → ég hef þýtt

Irregular words that include the same change as can be seen in the present tense include:

  • að sjá → ég hef séð
    • Same change as in the present tense "ég sé"
  • að taka → ég hef tekið
    • Same change as in the present tense "ég tek"

Irregular words that include the same change as in the past tense include:

  • að eiga → ég hef átt
    • Same change as in the past tense "ég átti"
  • að kaupa → ég hef keypt
    • Same change as in the past tense "ég keypti"
  • að þykja → mér hefur þótt
    • Same change as in the past tense "mér þótti"
  • að segja → ég hef sagt
    • Same change as in the past tense "ég sagði"
  • að spyrja → ég spurt
    • Same change as in the past tense "ég spurði"
  • að sækja → ég hef sótt
    • Same change as in the past tense "ég sótti"
  • að heimsækja → ég hef heimsótt
    • Same change as in the past tense "ég heimsótti"

And finally we have some that include the same change as can be seen in the past tense plural:

  • að fá → ég hef fengið
    • Same change as in the past tense plural "við fengum"
  • að finna → ég hef fundið
    • Same change as in the past tense plural "við fundum"
  • að vinna → ég hef unnið
    • Same change as in the past tense plural "við unnum"
  • að líða → mér hefur liðið
    • Same change as in the past tense plural "við liðum"[2]

The words listed above are the most important past participle forms that you need to memorize. They amount of irregularity is quite annoying, but most students get a hang of them quickly.


Notes

  1. Because this form does not change at all, you might see a few books describe it as its own form, called the supine (sagnbót) form. For example, BÍN lists this form by itself. However, since it always looks and behaves like the past participle, neuter, nominative, standard grammar books and school textbooks do not differentiate between the two. You can safely ignore this difference.
  2. But in the impersonal conjugation it's actually not declined and is just "okkur líður"
  • There are a handful of other helper words that can also result in a past participle, but they are so rarely used that you should not learn them.